What Blogging Has Done For Me

I have found blogging to be rewarding professionally and personally. One reason is that it has given me a voice in the digital world. Educators need a platform to talk about issues in education that matter to them. Blogging is a perfect outlet for educators to have their voices heard. A second reason is I love being able to give others a peek inside my room with regards to teaching writing. I hope other teachers can get ideas from my blogs that they would like to try in their own classrooms. I know that is one reason why I read teacher blogs. I am always on the hunt for ideas and best teacher practices. I have found so many of them by reading blogs written by teachers all over the United States.

A third reason is I love highlighting my students’ work. My blogs are full of examples of my first-grader’s writing. I want them to shine, not me. My students work so hard each day and they have been bitten by the writing bug! They want to stay at the Work on Writing station of Daily 5 instead of moving on to a new station. I like being able to show off their writing to others all around the country. A fourth reason is I hope other teachers can relate to me. I’m new at blogging and definitely don’t have all the answers, but I hope they can see that I am a hardworking teacher who is willing to try new things.

A fifth reason is I can share my excitement for a writing approach that I absolutely love! Blogging gives me a way to share with other teachers and administrators the wonderful unit of study by Lucy Calkins and Amanda Hartman I have been using in my first-grade classroom. I’ve been looking for a writing program that would elevate the level of my teaching as well as the level of writing of my students. I finally found it and want to shout it to the world and to anyone who is willing to listen. My first-graders have enjoyed studying Angela Johnson’s books looking for crafting techniques they can use in their own writing. It is such a wonderful feeling when your students bring a piece of writing to you and you can see evidence of them trying to use what they learned by studying an author’s book. Using Mentors as Authors has been the best thing I have ever tried with regards to writing instruction. Diving Into a Unit of Study!

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3 thoughts on “What Blogging Has Done For Me

  1. Susan Davis says:

    My students want to stay in the writing center too! It is great to see our students blossoming and enjoying writing. I agree, it is nice to be able to highlight our students and show others what is going right in our classrooms.

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  2. bethdaltonblog says:

    “One reason is that it has given me a voice in the digital world. Educators need a platform to talk about issues in education that matter to them. Blogging is a perfect outlet for educators to have their voices heard.”

    I feel that we are sharing so many more ideas that we never shared before and we are learning so many new ideas that we can use in our on classroom. I think blogging has helped me understand the obstacles that every teacher faces when it comes to writing and it also allows me to take part in the celebrations of writing and that’s what it’s all about. We are wanting to see these students grow and to be able to share our stories has helped me grow as a writer as well!

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  3. bethabuchholz says:

    You bring up a good point here: blogs offer us a chance to highlight students’ work/writing in classrooms rather than the focus solely being on what we are doing as teachers. This turns teachers into active researchers! I think that meetings, workshops, and classes often offer teachers time to talk about what they are doing in the classroom, but really it’s by looking at student work/writing that we’re able to see how what was taught was interpreted and learned by children, which of course is the point of teaching. 🙂

    Additionally, looking closely at student work allows teachers to more seriously reflect on their own teaching practices. There’s also something powerful about looking at student work/writing with a group of trusted colleagues; we’re able to learn more about our own students and our own teaching when in conversation with others.

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